Cultivating a Heroic Imagination at Catholic Match

My latest ‘Catholic Match’ piece is up; this one about the benefits of cultivating a heroic imagination. Or, in other words, I’m writing in praise of fantasizing:

It has been said that, “as a man thinketh, so he is,” but perhaps it would be equally accurate to say, “as a man imagineth, so he becomes.” Not because, in Napoleon Hill fashion, he imagines himself becoming a certain way and becomes so, but because through imagination he is able to feel the value of becoming a certain kind of man and consequently able to desire it.

That is why I say it is good for men to fantasize about heroic deeds; charging into the breech of a battle line, standing up for the truth against the ridicule of the world, and, of course, rescuing the damsel in distress. The imagination allows us to see heroism and self-sacrifice as valuable things, and thus to desire them for their own sake.

This heroic imagination is very helpful in relationships.

It should be clear now why I say this is a very useful practice, especially for a relationship. A man who regularly daydreams of slogging through the swamp to rescue the girl from the villain’s alligator farm has already created a mental habit of self-sacrifice and devotion in spite of hardship; the idea that ‘it is desirable to endure hardship for her sake; to protect her, comfort her, and provide for her.’

Read the rest here.

Captain Marvel gets MauLered

I’ve been waiting for this ever since the film came out. My favorite YouTube critic, MauLer, takes his trademark logical approach to the diseased tumor of a film known as ‘Captain Marvel.’ I’m glad to see that he shares most of my objections (which we’ll get to in turn), while reminding me of many that I’d forgotten or didn’t notice and going into full detail of just how awfully constructed this plot really is.

Sample: “…Meaning that this is a power limiter that only limits the subject’s power if they believe their power is limited. Who. Wrote. This?”

His evisceration of Fury losing his eye to the cat is particularly good, as are his compare and contrasts with the other MCU characters.

Oh, and he swears a good deal, so language warning.

 

Equality at the Everyman

At the Everyman today, I discuss why holding ‘equality’ up as an ideal is a terrible, terrible idea:

Which raises a more fundamental issue. Before you can say any two things are equal, you first have to have a common and objective standard of measurement between them. I can say that two people are of equal height because ‘height’ is an empirical measurement. But honesty, virtue, intelligence, wisdom, kindness, talent, beauty, and all the other factors by which we judge men are not empirically measurable (an IQ score is not an objective measure of intelligence, so that a man with an IQ of 100 is exactly twenty points smarter than a man with 80. It only serves, at best, to give a general idea of relative intelligence).

Thus, ‘equality’ cannot really apply to human beings in any meaningful sense. You cannot measure, say, wisdom and create a scale by which one man can be compared to another. We can identify these things to a greater or lesser degree, but we cannot empirically measure them. Moreover, these qualities are incommensurable: they cannot be compared one to another (how does talent measure up against wisdom? how many ‘units’ of beauty are equal to a single unit of virtue?). Moreover, even if we could, anyone can see that we would not, in fact, find ‘equality’ even between any two given individuals, let alone across the entire human race.

What this all amounts to is that ‘equality’ is simply meaningless when applied to human beings. Law is ‘equal’ in the sense of applying indiscriminately among the population (‘indiscriminate’ would probably would be a better term in the first place), but to say that all men are ‘equal’ in any other sense is simply a misuse of language, like saying that painting is on a level with music. The point is that there is no ‘level’ by which the two can be compared.

Read the rest here.

New Aleteia Post

I sent this in about three or four months ago; kind of expected it to have been dropped, but it’s up after all! On Aleteia today, In Defense of Grumpy Christians.

For such people there’s often a bit of a quandary: They know that, as Christians, they ought to love their neighbor and be good to others, but they can find being in the company of others to be emotionally draining and often irritating. They may, in fact, frequently feel like they’re being bad Christians — edged on, it must be said, by people who seem to equate “Christian love” with “being nice.” So, if you’re one of these “mean” Christians, or you know of them, here are some things to keep in mind …

How you relate to God is the main thing

If you’re the kind of person I’m describing, most likely you will alienate or offend other people at some point in your life. You’re not the sort who naturally inspires popularity, and this can be difficult. You will likely feel that it’s your fault and that it’s because you’re fundamentally flawed.

Remember that all people have flaws, however, and that God knows your struggles. Focus on pleasing Him, not on pleasing others. This way, not only will you be more likely to succeed, but you’ll probably find that you get along better with other people as well. Sincerity and good will are very attractive qualities, even when coupled with irritability, and if you cultivate these, people will recognize and value them.  

Read the rest here.

Bishop Sheen on the Three Confessions

Broadcasted 1957: Ven. Bishop Fulton Sheen traces the course of human sentiment through three great ‘Confessions:’ those of St. Augustine, of Abelard, and of Jean-Jacque Rousseau:

 

Money quote: “Jean-Jacque, therefore, gave birth to an entirely new concept of how to handle a conflict: namely, give way to it and call it right.”

Catholic Match Post on Knowing Your Date’s Career

My latest post is up at ‘Catholic Match,’ about the importance of knowing what you’re getting into with your significant other’s career.

The simple fact is that some careers are harder on relationship than others; some jobs simply require long hours, an unpredictable schedule, high stress, and a deep commitment.

There’s really nothing anyone can do about that; the nature of the job is what it is. If you fall in love with a man with this kind of career, you will have challenges that not everyone has to face.

(Obviously, the same thing applies for men falling for women with this kind of career).

For instance, police officers often say their job is a ‘marriage killer’ due to the combination of stress, long hours, irregular shift, and frequent overtime. Doctors too often find their shifts run long or they’re required to come in for extra work.

Similar issues emerge, to a greater or lesser degree, with military personnel, truckers, and emergency workers, among others. A person in these professions is going to be cancelling a lot of dates, missing a lot of holidays, and singing ‘Happy Birthday’ through a phone more often than not.

As I say, this is just the nature of the job, but it’s important to be aware of this before you get married.

Read the rest here.